2015 Fix California Challenge

Neighborhood Legislature Reform Act

An act, to be submitted for approved in the 2016 Ballot, to increase the ratio of representation in California by limiting the number of citizens each elected legislator may represent to 5000 (per State Senator) and 10,000 (per State Assembly member). There will be 3 beneficial results. First, elections will be conducted locally, door-to-door and on social media, without massive TV, radio and billboard campaigns. The special interests who pay for these campaigns and corruptly capture the representatives will be eliminated from the election. Local people will decide. Second, new candidates will emerge – everyday local people can run, since it won’t cost much. New local parties will emerge. Thirdly, citizen involvement will increase, with new high levels of turnout and participation in the political process. In this highly decentralized forum of 4000 Senate districts and 10,000 Assembly districts, candidates and representatives will be in direct touch with their constituencies, both personally (door-to-door, town meetings, phone calls) and digitally (personal e-mail, individual social media messages). Crowdsourcing of points of view on policy will thrive.

 

A working committee in Sacramento will draft laws for the approval of the neighborhood legislators. The working committee is 120 representatives (40 Senators, 80 Assembly members) each selected by 100 of their peers. They take a small salary, share a small staff, and draft all the laws for the approval of the entire Neighborhood Legislature. It’s a very efficient, low cost way to create legislation.

 

The new Neighborhood Legislature will eliminate the corrupting influence of special interest election expenditures. The newly emancipated representatives will be free to prepare and vote on legislation that reflects the local needs of their neighbors and not those of the centralized political, business and environmental elites.

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Voting

18 votes
40 up votes
22 down votes
Idea No. 99